May the gods smite the smug

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May the gods smite the smug
smug (adj.) Look up smug at Dictionary.com1550s, “trim, neat, spruce, smart,” possibly an alteration of Low Ger. smuk “trim, neat,” from M.L.G. smücken “to adorn,” and smiegen “to press close” (see smock). The meaning “having a self-satisfied air” is from 1701, an extension of the sense of “smooth, sleek” (1580s), which was commonly used of attractive women and girls. Related: Smugly; smugness.

  1. contentedly confident of one’s ability, superiority, or correctness; complacent.
  2. trim; spruce; smooth; sleek.
smite (v.) Look up smite at Dictionary.comO.E. smitan “to hit, strike, beat” (strong verb, pt. smat, pp. smiten), from P.Gmc. *smitanan (cf. Swed. smita, Dan. smide “to smear, fling,” O.Fris. smita, M.L.G., M.Du. smiten “to cast, fling,” Du. smijten “to throw,” O.H.G. smizan “to rub, strike,” Ger. schmeißen “to cast, fling,” Goth. bismeitan “to spread, smear”), perhaps from PIE root *(s)mei- “to smear, to rub,” but original sense in Germanic seems to be of throwing. Sense of “slay in combat” (c.1300) is originally Biblical, smite to death, first attested c.1200.
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