Blur {or, again with the krey-zee}

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This week has certainly gone by in a blur. 

Today: Another day of online training, a delicious mid-afternoon nap {dreams within dreams within dreams}, catching up on the most egregious bills, grabbing the twins, to the dollar store for safety pins, and then my eldest step-daughter’s final concert choir of the year.

Now, trying to wind down. It’s 80 something degrees in the house. Restless. Tired. Hot. No good fiction to absorb me. Wine. Hot Tea {it’s never too hot for tea}.

Tomorrow: Class, radio station interview in the afternoon, kids go to their mom’s for the weekend. I’ll probably edit interviews all weekend. Maybe plant those last seeds. Maybe visit the nearby farm with the CSA shares that start next week. Maybe actually get to the gym for yoga. Or something. Or at least hike Pilot Butte.

Try not to go stir-crazy.

stir-crazy 1908, from stir “prison” (1851), probably from Start Newgate (1757), prison in London, later any prison (1823), probably from Romany stardo “imprisoned,” related to staripen “a prison.” Mid-19c. sturaban, sturbin “state prison” seem to be transitional forms.

stir-cra·zy [stur-krey-zee]
adjective Slang.

    1. Informal. restless or frantic because of confinement, routine, etc.: I was stir-crazy after just two months of keeping house.
    2. mentally ill because of long imprisonment.

crazy 1570s, “diseased, sickly,” from craze + -y (2). Meaning “full of cracks or flaws” is from 1580s; that of “of unsound mind, or behaving as so” is from 1610s. Jazz slang sense “cool, exciting” attested by 1927. To drive (someone) crazy is attested by 1873. Phrase crazy like a fox recorded from 1935. Crazy Horse, Teton Lakhota (Siouan) war leader (d.1877) translates thašuka witko, lit. “his horse is crazy.”

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