Imaginative book world: ImaginoTransferenceRecordingDevice and Bestiary

Standard

Truthfully, I find the Thursday Next books a little hard to read. I’m on #3 and still having a hard time losing myself in the story. However, I do admire Fforde’s expansive imaginary book world. {Strange that I’d never heard of Fforde a few months ago.}

Check out the online Bestiary, complete with drawings. The adjectivore looks pretty much like I imagined, which says something about the talents of Fforde, or the artist (Maggy Roberts), or both.

And this, from The Well of Lost Plots, turns the reverence we have for novelists on its head:

ImaginoTransferenceRecordingDevice: A machine used to write books in the Well, the ITRD resembles a large horn (typically eight foot across and made of brass) attached to a polished mahogany mixing board a little like a church organ but with many more stops and levers. As the story is enacted in front of the collecting horn, the actions, dialogue, humour, pathos, etc, are collected, mixed and transmitted as raw data to Text Grand Central, where the wordsmiths hammer it into readable storycode. Once done it is beamed direct to the author’s pen or typewriter, and from there through a live footnoterphone link back to the Well as plain text. The page is read, and if all is well, it is added to the manuscript and the characters move on. The beauty of the system is that authors never suspect a thing—they think they do all the work. 

Commander Trafford Bradshaw, CBE
Bradshaw’s Guide to the BookWorld 

Also, oddly, here is a slightly altered definition from the online Jurisfiction Glossary:

ImaginoTransferenceRecordingDevice A machine used to write books in the sub-basements of The Great Library, the ITRD resembles a large horn (typically eight foot across and made of brass) attached to a polished mahogany mixing board a little like a church organ but with many more stops and levers. As the story is enacted in front of the collecting horn, the actions, dialogue, humour, pathos, etc, are collected, mixed by specially trained imaginators and transmitted as raw data to Text Grand Central where the wordsmiths hammer it into readable storycode. Once done it is beamed direct to the author’s pen or typewriter, and from there through a live footnoterphone link back to the ImaginoTransferenceRecordingDevice as plain text. The page is read and if all is well, it is added to the manuscript and the characters move on. The beauty of the system is that the author never suspects a thing—they think they do all the work.

Advertisements